Study Says Cannabis May Have Appeared In Europe Before Human Cultivation

By WeedMaps NewsJessica Peralta, provided exclusively to Benzinga Cannabis.

The evolution of cannabis may not be what we thought.

While cannabis is generally believed to have evolved in Asia and later dispersed to Europe by people, a May 2018 study published in the Vegetation History and Archaeobotany journal published by Springer concluded that the plant was most likely indigenous to Europe long before humans were present. And its cultivation began during the Copper or Bronze ages around 3200 BCE, but not before that, according to the study.

While cannabis is generally believed to have evolved in Asia and later dispersed to Europe by people, a May 2018 study concluded the plant was most likely indigenous to Europe long before humans were present.

“Not during the Neolithic Age, when Europe’s first farmers began cultivating other plants,” said John McPartland, the lead study researcher and a University of Vermont adjunct clinical professor. “Europe’s first farmers came from the Fertile Crescent, and they grew plants from the Fertile Crescent. This Fertile Crescent ‘crop package’ – wheat, barley, oats, etc. – included flax, Linum usitatissimum, a plant they grew for fiber [linen] and for seed oil.”

McPartland said the results of the study, “Cannabis is indigenous to Europe and cultivation began during the Copper or Bronze age: a probabilistic synthesis of fossil pollen …

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