Walsh, forecasters warn of dangerously high temperatures

Temperatures from Sunday through Tuesday will match or come dangerously close to matching record highs for Boston, prompting forecasters and Mayor Martin Walsh to urge people to take precautions — and avoid crowding on the beach.

Sunday’s high is expected to near 95, just shy of the record of 96 set in 1892, 1963 and 1989, said National Weather Service meteorologist William Leatham.

Temperatures on Monday are expected to be even higher, matching the record of 98 set in 1882, Leatham said.

And Tuesday will reach a high near 95 — short of the record of 99 set in 1949 — with wind gusts of up to 21 mph and a 30% chance of showers after 1 p.m., he said.

“It’s not unusual for us to get this kind of heat this time of year,” Leatham said. “As of right now, it’s not out of the question we could potentially break the daily record in Boston.”

The all-time record in the city was 104 degrees on July 4, 1911, he said.

  • BOSTON, MA – JULY 25-SATURDAY: Beachgoers crowd the sands of M Street Beach July 25, 2020, in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Paul Connors/Media News Group/)

  • BOSTON, MA – JULY 25-SATURDAY: Beachgoers crowd the sands of M Street Beach July 25, 2020, in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Paul Connors/Media News Group/Boston Herald)

  • BOSTON, MA – JULY 25-SATURDAY: Beachgoers crowd the sands of M Street Beach July 25, 2020, in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Paul Connors/Media News Group/Boston Herald)

  • BOSTON, MA – JULY 25-SATURDAY: Beachgoers crowd the sands of M Street Beach July 25, 2020, in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Paul Connors/Media News Group/Boston Herald)

  • BOSTON, MA – JULY 25-SATURDAY: Beachgoers crowd the sands of M Street Beach July 25, 2020, in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Paul Connors/Media News Group/Boston Herald)

  • BOSTON, MA – JULY 25-SATURDAY: Beachgoers crowd the sands of M Street Beach July 25, 2020, in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Paul Connors/Media News Group/Boston Herald)

  • BOSTON, MA – JULY 25-SATURDAY: Beachgoers crowd the sands of M Street Beach July 25, 2020, in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Paul Connors/Media News Group/Boston Herald)

  • BOSTON, MA – JULY 25-SATURDAY: Beachgoers crowd the sands of M Street Beach July 25, 2020, in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Paul Connors/Media News Group/Boston Herald)

  • BOSTON, MA – JULY 25-SATURDAY: Sade Buford, 9, of South Boston, throws her hair back while playing on the splash pas at Almont Playground July 25, 2020, in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Paul Connors/Media News Group/Boston Herald)

  • BOSTON, MA – JULY 25-SATURDAY: Alex Buxbaum, of Watertown, shoots a plastic hockey puck while playing a game of beach hockey with friends ar M Street Beach July 25, 2020, in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Paul Connors/Media News Group/Boston Herald)

  • BOSTON, MA – JULY 25-SATURDAY: Beachgoers crowd the sands of M Street Beach July 25, 2020, in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Paul Connors/Media News Group/Boston Herald)

  • BOSTON, MA – JULY 25-SATURDAY: Carson Sheffield, 1, of Boston, laughs while trying to grab a jet of water while playing on the splash pas at Almont Playground July 25, 2020, in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Paul Connors/Media News Group/Boston Herald)

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Last Friday, the mayor declared a heat emergency and said that 21 Boston Centers for Youth and Families would serve as “cooling centers” from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Sunday and from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Monday and Tuesday, in accordance with public health guidelines.

Residents should call before visiting to help adhere to pandemic occupancy limits, and they will be screened prior to entry and be required to wear a face covering. People also should bring their own water bottles and must limit belongings to one small bag.

The city’s two outdoor pools — BCYF Clougherty Pool in Charlestown and the BCYF Mirabella Pool in the North End — will be open from 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Visitors must register for a swim time slot and capacity will be less than 40%. “Tot sprays” also will be open at playgrounds throughout the city, with some restrictions.

Gov. Charlie Baker last Friday said crowding on beaches “simply can’t continue.”

“If people can’t space out and can’t do the things that everyone else is doing with respect to face coverings, social distancing and good hygiene, then we’ll have to limit the number of people who can be there,” Baker said at a press conference. “That’s not something we want to do.

That came a day after Walsh specifically called out Southie revelers at the M Street beach.

“We can’t afford to see more crowded beaches like we saw last weekend,” Walsh said at a press conference, reiterating a warning he’s made over the past few weeks.

Leatham warned people not to leave children, pets, the elderly or anyone with limited mobility in vehicles — even for a few minutes — without air conditioning.

If people do go outdoors, he said, they should bring water and take a break somewhere with air conditioning or fans to cool off.

“The big thing is for folks to stay safe and check on their neighbors,” Leatham said, especially the elderly and people with underlying conditions.

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