Study: Cannabis Use In Pregnancy May Be Associated With Autism Risk

 

This article was originally published on The Cannigma, and appears here with permission.

Canadian mothers who used cannabis during pregnancy were slightly more likely to give birth to a child that received an autism spectrum disorder diagnosis, according to a new study. An expert cautioned against drawing conclusions of causality, however.

The study, published in Nature Medicine, performed a retroactive analysis of all live births in Ontario, Canada between April 1, 2007 and March 31, 2012, with a focus on child neurodevelopmental outcomes. The researchers found that the incidence of autism spectrum disorder diagnosis was 4 per 1,000 persons among children with exposure to cannabis in the uterus, compared to 2.42 among unexposed children. 

A pregnant woman smoking marijuana from a bong. (lightfieldstudios/123rf)

“This is an interesting first step, but much more work is needed to implicate maternal cannabis use specifically in autism risk,” Danielle Fallin, the director of the Wendy King Center for Autism and Developmental …

Full story available on Benzinga.com

More Study: Cannabis Use In Pregnancy May Be Associated With Autism Risk