Ticker: Quincy Market pot shop hit with cease and desist; Gaming revenues back to pre-pandemic low

Plans for a pot shop in Quincy Market are on hold for now after the property management firm for the popular downtown tourist destination issued a cease and desist letter for the cannabis retailer, city officials confirmed.

The city’s Neighborhood Services department canceled a community meeting for Redemption Cannabis after Ashkenazy Acquisition Corp., which handles the leases for Faneuil Hall Marketplace, informed officials it intended to issue a cease and desist letter to the applicant regarding the proposed use, a spokeswoman for Mayor Martin Walsh’s office said.

There’s still hope for a cannabis retailer at the site, though. Officials said if the issues between Ashkenazy and Redemption Cannabis are resolved, the marijuana retailer can try again and move forward with the community process to seek the appropriate zoning relief and approval of the Boston Cannabis Board, which oversees all marijuana establishments in the city.

Gaming revenues back to pre-pandemic low

In the first full month of gambling operations since reopening, the two casinos and one slots parlor in Massachusetts pulled in just more than $71 million in gaming revenue, about $20 million of which will flow to the state as revenue.

The Mass. Gaming Commission reported August revenue at the three facilities — Plainridge Park Casino in Plainville, MGM Springfield and Encore Boston Harbor in Everett — on Tuesday and said the three facilities that are operating under capacity limits and without some popular table games generated 83% of the gross gaming revenue realized in August 2019.

State government can expect to collect about $10.6 million in August taxes — more than half of the monthly total — from Encore Boston Harbor’s $42.39 million in gross gaming revenue and another roughly $4.6 million in taxes from MGM Springfield’s roughly $18.46 million in revenue.

Combined, the two full-scale casinos generated about $15.2 million in tax revenue for the state last month. The two full-scale casinos in Massachusetts are taxed at a rate of 25% of their gross gaming revenue.

Massachusetts will also collect more than $4.06 million of Plainridge’s August revenue in the form of taxes intended for local aid and another roughly $915,207 for the Race Horse Development Fund.

More: Ticker: Quincy Market pot shop hit with cease and desist; Gaming revenues back to pre-pandemic low