Mexico: Supreme Court Cannabis Ruling Marks Progress, More To Do To Establish Functioning Market

On Monday, Mexico's Supreme Court voted down the country’s cannabis prohibition laws in an 8-3 vote.
The passage comes after the Senate and Congress missed several High Court-ordered deadlines to pass revised legislation.
Since 2019, lawmakers had been under a Supreme Court order to pass regulations after prohibition laws were deemed unconstitutional. However, delays halted progress, with legislative disagreements and the pandemic stalling processes.
Progress came in March when the lower House passed legislation but it failed to clear the Senate.
Under the Supreme Court decision, citizens are now allowed legal access to cannabis, negating the previous exclusivity to medical patients. Citizens can now be issued permits for adult use and cultivation through the Health Department until legislation is passed.
The ruling does not approve of citizens turning to the illicit market in the meantime. Rather, cultivation laws allow a person to grow six plants for personal use, with a cap of eight per household.
President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador responded to the news the following day, saying …

Full story available on Benzinga.com

More Mexico: Supreme Court Cannabis Ruling Marks Progress, More To Do To Establish Functioning Market