Playboy's White House Correspondent Talks Politics, Trump Drama And Weed

This article was originally published on The Fresh Toast and appears here with permission.

John Hudak, a leading voice in the space and a senior fellow at Brookings Institute, sat down with White House correspondent Brian Karem to discuss cannabis, politics, and that time Trump revoked his press pass. 

Additional writing by JJ McKay

Journalist, musician, rebel, and Playboy‘s Senior White House correspondent Brian Karem has lead a life that schoolboy dreams are made of. Karem is the lead singer of the Rhythm Bandits Band when he is not questioning the President and West Wing staff, or being a political analyst for CNN and his “Just Ask The Question” podcast.  

In August 2019, the Trump White House suspended Karem’s press pass. Karem filed a lawsuit in response and on June 5, 2020, Judge  David S. Tatel  of the  United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit  ruled the White House Press Office wrongly suspended Karem’s press pass allowing Karem to continue to cover the president.  In 1991, Kareem received the  National Press Club  Freedom of the Press award for refusing to reveal his sources in a story related to the killing of a police officer in  Texas.[4][5]   

John Hudak, a leading voice in the space and a senior fellow at Brookings Institute, sat down with Karem to discuss politics and marijuana. 

white house

Photo by Francois Galland/Getty Images

HUDAK: How did you get to become a White House reporter and someone who covers the White House and national politics?   

KAREM: I’ve been a reporter since 1980…something. I first covered the 1984 presidential campaign with Reagan. The first time I stepped into the briefing room was 1986, and I’ve covered national politics off and on for a variety of venues since then.   

HUDAK: Were you always interested in journalism? 

KAREM: I was always interested in writing. My family’s profession is mostly lawyers and judges, and I remember when I was a kid my uncle handed me a check and said “here go to law school.” And I tore it up, handed it back to him, and said, “I don’t want to.” 

I really wanted to write, and I had a really keen interest in seeing things as they happen. And that led me to journalism. Being able to see things as they happen and chronicle them and let people know what happened—I just felt more comfortable doing that than anything else. 

HUDAK: You’ve …

Full story available on Benzinga.com

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