Minnesota Cities Block Sale of Cannabis Edibles While They Develop Local Rules

A new law took effect July 1 in Minnesota to allow the sale of edibles and beverages infused with hemp-derived THC, but some of the state’s cities are pumping the brakes as they develop local rules for the industry.

In the past month, Marshall, Robbinsdale and St. Joseph have approved moratoriums on sales, according to the Duluth News Tribune, while other cities, including Waite Park and Prior Lake, are considering bans as they weigh regulations to govern -infused food and drinks.

In addition, Stillwater enacted a one-year moratorium on all product sales in November 2021, the Duluth News Tribune reported.

“We have no regulations,” Steve Meister, a city council member in Marshall, told the news outlet. “We have no monitoring. We have no taxing. I worry about the people who are most at risk: the children, the young, the elderly people on multiple medications. Taking a timeout just to do a little research on the pros, the cons, the benefits, the risks and figuring out how we’re going to deal with this not only in the city of Marshall, but the state, is a great idea.”

Under Minnesota’s new law, adults 21 and older can purchase “edible cannabinoid products” that contain no more than 5 milligrams of hemp-derived THC per serving and 50 milligrams per package, and no more than 0.3% THC by dry weight.

The sale of edibles containing delta-8 THC and CBD were already legal in the state, but the new law allows for delta-9 THC to be used as an

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